Halloween and Reformation Sunday

We had so much fun with halloween when our girls were growing up.  I wasn’t much on sewing or spending much money on costumes, but we tried to be creative with sheets, of course, and masks and hats.  It was a day for everyone to pretend. In elementary school, we moved on to the school carnival–running auctions, games, etc., but all involving the whole family. Oh, how I hated making those pumpkin cookies for kindergarten class!! I’m so thankful for the memories now.

I’m also thankful for the day Martin Luther nailed his 23 ideas on the Catholic Church door in Germany in 1513.  Now, you know, I’m really a historian at heart.  History is what my education and school teaching was all about.  But, this is even more about spiritual things and Christian history.  I’ve been so blessed by what came out of the Reformation he started that day.  Even more blessed than by our fun on halloween.

  Luther started a “discussion” of ideas that resulted in the good newsl being made more clear to everyone–that salvation was by faith alone. Faith is our steadfast belief that Jesus’s perfect life–His righteousness–was the only thing that could ever erase the condemnation due us because of our sin.  The key words are alone and only.  Luther had read the first five chapters of Romans!  Sadly, the Catholic Church would not accept this, and has not changed any of their views about it since, so we have a great split in the Christian traditions.  Reformation Sunday celebrates his courage and this good news that Jesus is the One promised from the beginning.

I’m blessed because God has given me this faith, and I don’t need to add anything else to it–no ceremony I can attend, no good deeds for my community, no amount of church work, no amount of sacrifice….just faith in the work of Christ Jesus–his perfect life, death, burial, and resurrection— to be enough to cover all my sins. 

Blessings and fun memories to think about……

About Carol Brandt

I earned a B.A. in History from Florida State University and M.Ed in.Higher Education from Florida Atlantic University. I taught high school social studies before “retiring” to full-time homemaking and raising two daughters. Now I love being a grandmother to four boys and a girl. I have also raised five collies.

My husband, John, was an optometrist, who worked tirelessly for his profession through private practice and as a consultant, and served on the Board of Trustees of Illinois College of Optometry for twenty years.

Ernest Reisinger was my chief mentor in this warm-hearted application of Calvinism. He gave me many books! The Founders Journal and Founders Conferences, Martyn Lloyd-Jones, and Charles Spurgeon have been other sources of Reformed thinking as well as the other warm-hearted ones listed in my book, “Warm-hearted Calvinists.”

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