Talking Points

The planet Venus is 24 million miles from earth.  If the sky is clear at sunset tonight, Venus will be shining brightly in the SW sky by 7:55 p.m. EDT.

Take your child or grandchild outside and have a talk about several catechism questions:

Who made you?   God

What else did God make?  God made all things

Why did God make you and all things?  For His own glory.

How can you glorify God?  By loving Him and doing what He commands.

Why are you to glorify God?  Because He made me and takes care of me.

Remember, to glorify means to reflect some small measure of what God is like. So since God made us and takes care of us, we should repond with loving obedience and that is exactly what reflects the true nature of God.

Looking at Venus is also a wonderful opportunity to introduce the power of God’s spoken word in making something out of nothing.  Genesis 1:1 says, “In the beginning God created the heavens and the earth.” Notice that s.  That would include Venus.  So leave your child wondering about the wonder of it all.  “And God said it was very good.”

He still speaks today—through the Spirit’s lighting up the Bible’s meaning for us.  Come inside and, at least, look up Genesis 1:1!

SHOW ME JESUS

When you pray, thank God that Jesus was there in the beginning, saying, “And it is very good!”

About Carol Brandt

I earned a B.A. in History from Florida State University and M.Ed in.Higher Education from Florida Atlantic University. I taught high school social studies before “retiring” to full-time homemaking and raising two daughters. Now I love being a grandmother to four boys and a girl. I have also raised five collies.

My husband, John, was an optometrist, who worked tirelessly for his profession through private practice and as a consultant, and served on the Board of Trustees of Illinois College of Optometry for twenty years.

Ernest Reisinger was my chief mentor in this warm-hearted application of Calvinism. He gave me many books! The Founders Journal and Founders Conferences, Martyn Lloyd-Jones, and Charles Spurgeon have been other sources of Reformed thinking as well as the other warm-hearted ones listed in my book, “Warm-hearted Calvinists.”

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