Solomon’s Gift

Divide this story up into parts, depending on the age of the child.  Don’t forget to be direct about how it applies to their little heart, especially how they are thinking about God.

“Every perfect gift is from above…”

Once there was an old man named Solomon.  His name meant “beloved by God.”  He had not always been old.  Once he little, just like you.  His name reminded him that God loved him.  He was dear to God– like you are dear to me.  Do you think God loves you like that?

Solomon’s father was a King.  King David, the one who made Jerusalem a city of God. It was a neighborhood of peace, and where worshiping God was what people were expected to do.  His father was very rich and his mother must have been very beautiful.  Both of them really loved Solomon a lot–like I love you. There was a lot of singing and music in Solomon’s young life.  His father wrote songs all the time. Remember this one, “The Lord is my shepherd; I shall not want.  He makes me lie down in green pastures; He leads me beside still waters.  Even though I walk in the shadow of death, I will fear no evil, for You are with me;…” (Psalm 23).

King David wanted Solomon to be very wise. His mother taught him too.  They must have had a lot of fun talking about things—just like we do.  When Solomon grew up and became the King, God gave him a special gift: the ability to study and write.  He collected wise sayings on the best way to life and wrote them all down.  They were put into a book called Proverbs. That is one of the books in our Bible.  You will soon be able to read them for yourself!  One says: “A wise son makes a glad father, but a foolish son is a sorrow to his mother” (Proverbs 10:1).

Solomon was king of Israel for forty years. Everyone knew what a great and wise king he was.  People came from far away just to see the beautiful cities he built and to learn from him.  Ships brought him treasures from all over the world–even apes from Africa!  No one in Israel had ever seen an ape.  What fun they must have had thinking about how God made everything.  We love doing that, don’t we?  Remember the wolves we saw at the zoo? And the girafes? Solomon wanted everyone to remember that “In the beginning, God created the heavens and the earth” (Genesis 1:1).

When Solomon was old, he became a great preacher.  He was a collector of God’s truths and wanted to tell others about them. So he wrote another book about the meaning of  life: what life is all about.  Proverbs tells us how to live.  Ecclesiastes says that life is all about knowing God.  Nothing else is as important as that.

Solomon had learned this lesson the hard way. He needed a Savior just like we do. He got so busy with being king, he stopped thinking about God as the most important person in his life. He started going along with all those around him who didn’t think about needing a Savior.  He had to tell God how sorry he was and go back to loving God and doing what He commands.

But this story is about a little rich boy who had a special gift from God. He used his special gift of  observing and collecting God’s truth to help other people.  He wanted them to love God.  He knew that knowing God was the most important thing in life. He knew he

What do you want to be when you grow up?  A fireman?  A solder? A mother? a father?  Be on the lookout for the special gift God might give you to help others. I wonder what it will be?

About Carol Brandt

I earned a B.A. in History from Florida State University and M.Ed in.Higher Education from Florida Atlantic University. I taught high school social studies before “retiring” to full-time homemaking and raising two daughters. Now I love being a grandmother to four boys and a girl. I have also raised five collies.

My husband, John, was an optometrist, who worked tirelessly for his profession through private practice and as a consultant, and served on the Board of Trustees of Illinois College of Optometry for twenty years.

Ernest Reisinger was my chief mentor in this warm-hearted application of Calvinism. He gave me many books! The Founders Journal and Founders Conferences, Martyn Lloyd-Jones, and Charles Spurgeon have been other sources of Reformed thinking as well as the other warm-hearted ones listed in my book, “Warm-hearted Calvinists.”

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