Bible Story For Children

Today I’m starting a new Category to help you tell Bible stories to children.  Of course, there won’t be pictures to look at together as you talk.  Their imaginations can provide those pictures if you encourage it.  After all, that is what the Bible does all the time, i.e. the Holy Spirit is like a refreshing stream or fountain; God is like a Rock, a refuge; Jerusalem’s survival from the Assyrians is like a flag waving on a hill.  So encourage that kind of thinking in your children as you tell the story.  And be sure they know it is a real story; it actually happened.  Adapt your vocabulary and the details to fit the child. Always apply the story to their life as you go along.  The idea for this story came from my grandson’s fascination with the water drains in our neighborhood and from Roger Ellsworth’s explanation of the passage.

II Samuel 5: 1-10     King David’s City

Even though everyone knew David had been chosen by God to be the King, he had to hide in caves and deserted places for many years.  A lot of people came to help him, but Saul and his friends kept trying to kill David.  What did he feel like having so many people trying to kill him?  He wrote a lot of songs about it. (Psalm 35  is one of them. Jesus was probably comforted by this Psalm while the religious leaders were seeking to kill Him.)

Anyway, David finally became king of God’s people.  He stayed King for forty years!  But during those years,  he had to fight those who hated God and His people.

There was one group of people whose city was on a hill with valleys all around three sides, and a big wall on the fourth side for protection.  They made fun of David.  They said his army could never capture their city.  His army couldn’t come across those valleys, climb up the hill, or come over the wall!  Have you ever had someone make fun of you and dare you to do something?  These people were really making fun of God and daring David to do something about it.

My town has water drains to protect us against floods.  Each drain is connected  by a big pipe to an even bigger pipe that lets all the water flow into the river and out to the ocean.  It is fun to look down the drains and try to figure out how they get the water to the ocean.

This town on a hill, soon to be named Jerusalem, had to get water into the town for drinking, bathing and things like that.  David found out how to get into that big water pipe. David’s army came quietly up that big shaft right into the city!  They had arrows, some swords, and spears, and other weapons.  They fought and took over the city. The wall, the hill and valleys couldn’t keep the army of God out!  David was standing up to the people who made fun of God.  It became known as the city of David, Jerusalem.  The city changed completely after David took over.  No more idols.  Only the worship of God was allowed.

Our hearts are like this city.  Suddenly God can sweep into our heart, change things, clean it up, give us a new heart that wants to love God and follow Him. In this story, King David reminds us of our Savior, Jesus, who conquers our sinful hearts and is our King.  Jesus lived a perfect life, and then died so we could know God.  He was related to David, yet He is God!  He saves His people from all over the world.

Ask God to come quietly into your heart one day just like King David and his army came up the water shaft into Jerusalem.  Your sins will be forgiven and conquered.  You will grow to love God more and more.

About Carol Brandt

I earned a B.A. in History from Florida State University and M.Ed in.Higher Education from Florida Atlantic University. I taught high school social studies before "retiring" to full-time homemaking and raising two daughters. Now I love being a grandmother to four boys and a girl. I have also raised five collies. My husband, John, was an optometrist, who worked tirelessly for his profession through private practice and as a consultant, and served on the Board of Trustees of Illinois College of Optometry for twenty years. Ernest Reisinger was my chief mentor in this warm-hearted application of Calvinism. He gave me many books! The Founders Journal and Founders Conferences, Martyn Lloyd-Jones, and Charles Spurgeon have been other sources of Reformed thinking as well as the other warm-hearted ones listed in my book, "Warm-hearted Calvinists."

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