Are You Contentious?

Thinking about Proverb 21 today?  What about 21:9?

“Better to dwell in a corner of a housetop, than in a house shared with a contentious woman.”

or 21:19..

“Better to dwell in the wilderness, Than with a contentious and angry woman.”

Ask yourself:  What does this mean?

To be contentious is to strive or quarrel…to be in conflict; in discord…to be belligerent.  Notice in verse 19, anger is added.  It is all about verbal strife with an undertone of anger.

This kind of “communicating” ruins a home.  You’re better off getting out of the house!  It would be true of anyone, but in this case, an angry, argumentive woman is singled out.

In verse 23, everyone is urged to guard his mouth–whether male or female.  And in v. 24, a man who is haughty and proud is singled out for his arrogant pride.

Of course, the point is the arrogant pride, not the male vs. female.

The root of this home’s problem is pride.  That has to be faced and turned from–rooted out, so to speak, and then the arguing and strife can be stopped.  And if there are two of you ruled by this SELF- LOVE, then the home is ready to explode.

Being contentious just reveals your own arrogance.  Stop it; then go further and love others more than yourself.

My, we need a Savior’s righteousness don’t we?

About Carol Brandt

I earned a B.A. in History from Florida State University and M.Ed in.Higher Education from Florida Atlantic University. I taught high school social studies before “retiring” to full-time homemaking and raising two daughters. Now I love being a grandmother to four boys and a girl. I have also raised five collies.

My husband, John, was an optometrist, who worked tirelessly for his profession through private practice and as a consultant, and served on the Board of Trustees of Illinois College of Optometry for twenty years.

Ernest Reisinger was my chief mentor in this warm-hearted application of Calvinism. He gave me many books! The Founders Journal and Founders Conferences, Martyn Lloyd-Jones, and Charles Spurgeon have been other sources of Reformed thinking as well as the other warm-hearted ones listed in my book, “Warm-hearted Calvinists.”

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