THINKING UPSIDE DOWN

caption id=”attachment_234″ align=”alignnone” width=”225″ caption=”John William “]John William [/caption]

Brandt and John

Brandt and John

dsc04806

Grandchildren sure light up my life. They remind us of God’s infinite ability to create. Each child is, of course, entirely unique, but also a reminder of the families’ genes from which he comes.
He is our creator; we are the clay, not the potter who molds it. Remembering that principle makes all the difference in how we live. These three boys remind us all of that everyday!

Isaiah used this Creator principle to rebuke the citizens of Jerusalem 2700 years ago:

“Ah, you who hide deep from the LORD your counsel, whose deeds are in the dark, and who say, ‘Who sees us? Who knows us?”
You turn things upside down! Shall the potter be regarded as the clay, that the thing made should say of its maker, ‘He did not make me’; or the thing formed say of him who formed it, ‘He has no understanding’? (Isaiah 29:15-16)

Probably the most important thing to teach little children is a regard for God as their Creator. Do all you can to instill it early because that view of God leads to reverence and awe. All of our earth and what we can see of the universe screams it. And that screaming will be a reminder to them the rest of their lives not to turn things upside down
thinking they are in charge and God has nothing to do with their daily lives.
Of course, upside down thinking has lots of repercussions for you as well. Are you approaching God with reverence, respect, and a biblical fear? In that awesome day of His judgment (or your physical death), are you righteous enough or perfect enough to enter His holy and pure presence? Why should He let you into His courtyard? Upside down thinking has all kind of answers–even to believing there is no life after death.

“It (

righteousness, perfect life) will be counted to us who believe in Him who raised from the dead Jesus our Lord, who was delivered up for our trespasses and raised for our justification” (Romans 4 :24-25).
We have to ask the right questions to think correctly about spiritual things. The question is not: Do I talk to God? Or to use a currently popular way of putting it: Do I have a personal relationship with God?
The real question is: Since God is just and perfectly holy, how can I even think about entering His presence? Who am I to claim to have a personal relationship with the Creator of the universe? The books of Isaiah and Romans have the answers. Read them, asking the right questions! I will come along beside you and help.

About Carol Brandt

I earned a B.A. in History from Florida State University and M.Ed in.Higher Education from Florida Atlantic University. I taught high school social studies before "retiring" to full-time homemaking and raising two daughters. Now I love being a grandmother to four boys and a girl. I have also raised five collies. My husband, John, was an optometrist, who worked tirelessly for his profession through private practice and as a consultant, and served on the Board of Trustees of Illinois College of Optometry for twenty years. Ernest Reisinger was my chief mentor in this warm-hearted application of Calvinism. He gave me many books! The Founders Journal and Founders Conferences, Martyn Lloyd-Jones, and Charles Spurgeon have been other sources of Reformed thinking as well as the other warm-hearted ones listed in my book, "Warm-hearted Calvinists."

Comments are closed