Devotional For Mothers

Children want our attention. Have you noticed? Just pick up the phone and see what they can get into! My grandchildren love it when I have no other agenda than to play with them–at their level. It’s great not to have that electricity in the air which occurs when a pre-schooler is competing for attention. Just let Daddy walk in the door and desire a conversation with you…you can feel that tension. It goes much better if everyone focuses on welcoming him home and if he has no agenda himself for a half hour. That’s not so easy when everyone arrives home together. But, wise decisions show their correctness later on.

Don’t ask for a blueprint. Take biblical principles and work these daily things out for yourself. Talking about them help you “work it out.”

Identify the foundational principles that apply to the circumstances.They frequently seem to conflict.

Children are self-centered, immature, and are affected like all of us by the sinfulness of human nature.

Children must be trained, corrected… helped to grow…sometimes disciplined.

We are all to love God and each other.

Honor your father and your mother.

What other biblical principles do you think apply here?

Think about how these principles impact what you do.
If I had my grandchildren every day, my non-agenda approach would be impossible. If I over-focused on their natural self-centeredness, I might think it wrong to play so much with them. If I only thought about training and correcting, then playing would seem like a waste of time. If I forgot they need correction and discipline, what kind of grandparent would I be? If I played only fun things with no reference to God or just a quick prayer….oops. Out of balance again.

Enjoy your freedom to do things the way you think is best.

Just remember to keep a clear conscience, serve the LORD with gladness, and pray that God will bless your thinking it out for yourself.

About Carol Brandt

I earned a B.A. in History from Florida State University and M.Ed in.Higher Education from Florida Atlantic University. I taught high school social studies before "retiring" to full-time homemaking and raising two daughters. Now I love being a grandmother to four boys and a girl. I have also raised five collies. My husband, John, was an optometrist, who worked tirelessly for his profession through private practice and as a consultant, and served on the Board of Trustees of Illinois College of Optometry for twenty years. Ernest Reisinger was my chief mentor in this warm-hearted application of Calvinism. He gave me many books! The Founders Journal and Founders Conferences, Martyn Lloyd-Jones, and Charles Spurgeon have been other sources of Reformed thinking as well as the other warm-hearted ones listed in my book, "Warm-hearted Calvinists."

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