Finish the Story

My grandson, Benjamin, is all into Noah’s ark. Chiefly, I think, because he loves to make animal sounds! The monkey is his favorite. He is also into boats big time. So Noah’s adventures make for lively interaction.

All this is a lot of fun, but any animal story would do for that. For  spiritual profit, we need to do more than just tell fun stories. In this case, we need to add what most of the picture books leave out–the meaning of it all. The flood was a judgment of God and is a picture of the judgment to come– the wrath and justice of God sweeping away sinners. The ark saved Noah and his family, and symbolizes Jesus as our Savior.  Noah was in the ark just as believers are “in Christ” (Romans 4).  Noah found grace (unearned favor) in the sight of the Lord. He then believed God, floated to safety, and saw the rainbow as a token of God’s promise never to flood the earth again. Flood, ark, rainbow–visual images all.

Why in the world would you bring this up to a two-year-old? Every kid is different, but familiarity and repetition help all of us remember. In this case, you are giving him visual images he will never forget. Who knows how the Holy Spirit will use those simple images of judgment and salvation down the road?

Genesis 6-9 and II Peter 3 were written by Moses and Peter more than a thousand years apart. It is all for us to”grow in the grace and knowledge of our Lord and Savior Jesus Christ” (II Peter 3:18). Keep on believing even when others joke about it. And finish the story so your child will have these images to fall back on when the Holy Spirit convicts him of his own need to flee the judgment to come.

About Carol Brandt

I earned a B.A. in History from Florida State University and M.Ed in.Higher Education from Florida Atlantic University. I taught high school social studies before "retiring" to full-time homemaking and raising two daughters. Now I love being a grandmother to four boys and a girl. I have also raised five collies. My husband, John, was an optometrist, who worked tirelessly for his profession through private practice and as a consultant, and served on the Board of Trustees of Illinois College of Optometry for twenty years. Ernest Reisinger was my chief mentor in this warm-hearted application of Calvinism. He gave me many books! The Founders Journal and Founders Conferences, Martyn Lloyd-Jones, and Charles Spurgeon have been other sources of Reformed thinking as well as the other warm-hearted ones listed in my book, "Warm-hearted Calvinists."

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