Knowing and Weeping

The details of Jesus’ life between Palm Sunday and Easter have been of particular interest to me over the years. Luke paints a contrasting picture between the palm-waving entry and Jesus’ tears of reality as He thinks about Jerusalem’s attitude toward Him. He knew the palms didn’t mean much. They really had rejected Him. They had hardened their hearts. They refused to hear! And He knew what sorrows lay ahead for them because of that. In less that forty years, the Romans would destroy the city, tearing it down rock by rock. He weeps as he predicts this judgment to come (Luke 18:41-44).

Often we have something to cry about. A friend’s failing marriage, perhaps. Cancer reoccurance. .Hearing that one in four teens have some kind of sexual disease to pass on to others. Or that our leaders still muck around with whomever and we have to hear the details on the evening news.

They could have known “the things that make for peace! But now they are hidden from your eyes.” What things? As Paul would later explain, we have peace and hope only by faith in our Lord Jesus Christ (Romans 5:1-2). This was nothing new to the residents of Jerusalem. They knew the story of Abraham’s belief in God’s promise and how his faith was counted as righteousness. And now, Jesus had just raised Lazarus from death a couple of weeks earlier as a public demonstration of His power and claims. He was continuing to say He was the promised Savior and would be killed for our trespasses and raised for our right standing with God. In explaining this hardened unbelief, Paul quotes Isaiah’s prediction of a “spirit of stupor, eyes that would not see and ears that would not hear” (Romans 11:8). Hidden truths, blind eyes, deaf ears….

We can’t know or predict in the same way Jesus did.  Our knowing is limited; we don’t always know the whys. But, notice Jesus wipes His tears, then calls for the temple to be a house of prayer and continued proclaiming the good news of salvation each day (Luke 19:45-20:1). That is what we need to be doing too. So wipe away your tears, and keep on praying and telling others why you have hope. Jesus is alive! The Holy Spirit is with us.

About Carol Brandt

I earned a B.A. in History from Florida State University and M.Ed in.Higher Education from Florida Atlantic University. I taught high school social studies before “retiring” to full-time homemaking and raising two daughters. Now I love being a grandmother to four boys and a girl. I have also raised five collies.

My husband, John, was an optometrist, who worked tirelessly for his profession through private practice and as a consultant, and served on the Board of Trustees of Illinois College of Optometry for twenty years.

Ernest Reisinger was my chief mentor in this warm-hearted application of Calvinism. He gave me many books! The Founders Journal and Founders Conferences, Martyn Lloyd-Jones, and Charles Spurgeon have been other sources of Reformed thinking as well as the other warm-hearted ones listed in my book, “Warm-hearted Calvinists.”

Comments are closed